Cyprus Mail
Motoring

Porsche goes electric

The new generation of the Panamera boasts aesthetic changes and improvements to the existing engine, and the S E-Hybrid returns consumption of just 3.1 litres per 100 kilometers and has CO2 emissions of 71 gr/km

PREMIERED at the Paris Motor show last year, the Cayenne S E-Hybrid joins the Panamera S E-Hybrid and the 918 Spyder to give the luxury German marque three plug-in models in its line-up, and the first two are now in the showrooms of Porsche’s Cyprus agent, A.I.Motokinisi.

We may not readily associate Porsche with the frugality of hybrid propulsion, but the first model that the brand’s founder Ferdinand Porsche helped to develop actually had an electric drive system. The Egger-Lohner C.2 Phaeton, built in 1898, weighed 130 pounds and used a DC motor with 3kW power.

It was presented in 1898 at an exhibition for the newly founded Austrian Automobile Club. With an electric motor installed transversely between the front wheels and steered rear wheels, this electric vehicle was still far from being ready for series production.

The vehicle concept was discarded and other test vehicles were built – this time in line with the ideas developed by young Ferdinand Porsche, who favoured front wheel stub axle steering and the electric motor at the rear of a Lohner carriage. The result of his vision, the ‘Egger-Lohner C.2 electric vehicle’, rolled onto the streets of Vienna for the first time on June 26, 1898, and Porsche made sure that he would take credit for the vehicle’s design in an unusual manner: he engraved the code ‘P1’ (P for Porsche, number 1) onto all of the key components, thus giving the vehicle its unofficial name.

Having been chief designer at Lohner, Austro-Daimler, Daimler-Benz and Steyr, Porsche was able to draw on over 30 years of experience in the automotive industry when he founded his own company in Stuttgart in 1931. The rest, as they say, is history.

Renowned for building fast sports cars, Porsche is also savvy enough to stay abreast of motoring trends, and they see e-mobility as the future. “It’s about nothing less than proving that efficiency and sports performance can go hand in hand”.

Panamera S E-Hybrid
The new generation of the Panamera boasts aesthetic changes and improvements to the existing engine, and the S E-Hybrid returns consumption of just 3.1 litres per 100 kilometers and has CO2 emissions of 71 gr/km. The supercharged V6 3-litre engine has combined power of 416 hp and 520 Nm of torque, ensuring that the four-door coupe can reach one hundred kilometers an hour from a standstill in just 5.5 seconds, while maximum speed is 270 km/h.
The plug-in hybrid Panamera uses new lithium ion batteries and has an electric-only range of 18 – 36 km. Maximum speed in electric mode is 135 km/h. The battery charging time is about four hours on a household voltage grid, and less than two and a half hours on a high voltage network.

Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid
The Cayenne hybrid uses the same parallel plug-in system as the Panamera and the other specs are pretty similar, although it takes 5.9 seconds to reach 100km/h and top speed is 243 km/h (125km/h on electric-only). Emissions are 79g CO2 per kilometer, and consumption is 3.4l/100 km.
Of the 16,698 Panameras sold in the first eight months of last year, 1,513 were S E-Hybrid models – that’s about nine per cent, and the German car maker says it is expecting ‘very high’ sales figures for the Cayenne S E-Hybrid.

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