Cyprus Mail
Europe

Mediterranean ‘by far world’s deadliest border’ for migrants: IOM

Migrants disembark from 'Nave Diciotti' Italian Coast Guard vessel in the Sicilian harbour of Messina

More than 33,000 migrants have died at sea trying to reach European shores this century, making the Mediterranean “by far the world’s deadliest border”, the United Nations migration agency said on Friday.

After record arrivals from 2014 to 2016, the European Union’s deal with Turkey to stop arrivals from Greece, and robust patrols off Libya’s coast have greatly reduced the flow, the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) said.

Professor Philippe Fargues of the European University Institute in Florence, author of the report, said the figures probably underestimated the actual scale of the human tragedy.

“The report states that at least 33,761 migrants were reported to have died or gone missing in the Mediterranean between the year 2000 to 2017. This number is as of June 30,” IOM’s Jorge Galindo told a Geneva news briefing.

“It concludes that Europe’s Mediterranean border is by far the world’s deadliest,” he said.

So far this year some 161,000 migrants and refugees have arrived in Europe by sea, about 75 per cent of them landing in Italy with the rest in Greece, Cyprus and Spain, according to IOM figures. Nearly 3,000 others are dead or missing, it said.

“Shutting the shorter and less dangerous routes can open longer and more dangerous routes, thus increasing the likelihood of dying at sea,” Fargues said.

The report said: “Cooperation with Turkey to stem irregular flows is now being replicated with Libya, the main country of departure of migrants smuggled along the central route; however, such an approach is not only morally reprehensible but likely to be unsuccessful, given the context of extremely poor governance, instability and political fragmentation in Libya.”

Libya’s UN-backed government said on Thursday it was investigating reports of African migrants being sold as slaves and promised to bring the perpetrators to justice.

Footage broadcast by CNN appearing to show African migrants being traded in Libya sparked an international outcry and protests in Europe and Africa.


Related posts

As virus spreads to more Chinese cities, WHO calls emergency meeting

Reuters News Service

Trump lawyers call for immediate acquittal in legal, political defense

Reuters News Service

Huawei CFO Meng arrives in Canada court for U.S. extradition trial kick off

Reuters News Service

UK PM Johnson defeated on Brexit legislation for first time since election

Reuters News Service

Why the Berlin agreement on Libya is a failure

.

Tech companies back facial recognition ban

Reuters News Service

4 comments

Comments are closed.