Cyprus Mail
Environment

The flowers of evil bloom in paint

Once you are in the arts, it seems easy to move from one art to another. Singers and actors have switched roles uncountable times so why can’t a composer also be a painter?

One such artist, Andreas Moustoukis, will leave behind his musical skills for a while as he concentrates on his painting exhibition entitled Les Fleurs Du Mal at the Elements Gallery in Larnaca, to open on Friday at 7.30pm.

The works within this collection were inspired by the poetic works of French poet Charles Baudelaire. The images and emotions that shine through in Baudelaire’s poetry are now reflected in the passionate brushstrokes and colourful mixing of Moustoukis’ brush.

According to organisers “with his painting style, Moustoukis improvises the decadent and erotic theme of Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du Mal (a volume of poetry by the poet, published in 1857) with strong movement strokes and powerful colour compositions, very much like the music virtuoso he is.”

Moustoukis, from Nicosia, studied at the St Petersburg Conservatory. A number of his musical works have been performed and recorded by the Saint Petersburg State Symphony Orchestra, the Mariinski Theatre Youth Orchestra, the Ensemble Dissonart and others. His works include chamber music and large-scale works. He is currently a professor of composition at the ARTE Academy of music and he is the vice president of the Centre of Cypriot Composers.

Les Fleurs Du Mal
Solo exhibition by Andreas Moustoukis. Opens December 1 at 7.30pm until December 15. Elements Gallery, Larnaca. Tel: 99-325303

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