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European Commission warns Cyprus on various failings

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The European Commission has issued warnings to Cyprus for failing to show progress on issues relating to energy, the professional qualifications of engineers and architects, anti-money laundering measures and road safety, it was announced on Thursday.
The warnings, in the form of letters of formal notice were part of the December infringements package issued by the EC.
Cyprus, along with the Czech Republic, received a letter of formal notice requesting it to ensure the correct implementation and application of the electricity and gas directives.
“The Directives are part of the Third Energy Package and contain key legal provisions which allow energy markets to function properly,” the EC said.
The commission also sent a formal notice to Cyprus for not recognising the professional training in the fields of engineering and architecture acquired by Cypriot citizens in other member states, “which does not seem to be in line” with the relevant directive.
In addition, it said, national rules do not fully respect the principle of automatic recognition of professional qualifications acquired abroad by architects as laid down in the same directive.
“Cyprus now has two months to remedy the situation; otherwise, the commission may decide to send a reasoned opinion to Cyprus,” it said.
At the same time, the commission is urging Cyprus to remove restrictions in certain regulations of professions which are incompatible with EU law.
The commission also urged Cyprus, along with Bulgaria, Greece, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland and Romania, to transpose the fourth anti-money laundering directive into their national legislations.
“The new EU rules will strengthen the existing anti-money laundering requirements and improve the fight against money laundering and terrorism financing,” it said.
All member states had to transpose this directive by June 26. All eight countries have already received letters of formal notice last July and the commission is now calling on them to take the necessary measures to fully comply with the directive.
“If these member states fail to bring their national legislation into line with EU law within the next two months, the commission may decide to refer the cases to the court of justice of the EU”.
Cyprus has also two months to fully transpose and implement the directive on periodic roadworthiness tests for motor vehicles and trailers.
Directive 2014/45/EU covers all types of vehicles and defines harmonised requirements for the items to be tested during the roadworthiness test, the methods, the defects and their assessment. “Failure to transpose and implement the directive leads to an inconsistent application of the rules across the EU with detrimental effects on road safety,” it said.
If Cyprus fails to abide, the commission may send a reasoned opinion on this matter.


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