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Greek Cypriot refugee asks ECHR not to close her property case yet

Titina Loizidou

Titina Loizidou, a Greek Cypriot refugee who won a case against Turkey in the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) regarding her property in the north has sent a letter to Strasbourg asking the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe to adjourn consideration of closing here case as she has not been given back her property yet.

The Committee of Ministers is currently holding its quarterly meeting in Strasbourg to oversee the execution of judgments from the ECHR.
After the 1996 Court decision, Loizidou was compensated by Ankara for not being able to use her home in Kyrenia. Her property however was not returned to her.

Loizidou’s case was brought again to the Secretariat of the Committee of Ministers last November, in relation to the continuing violation of her property rights for the period 28 January 1987 – 22 January 1990 during which time she was not compensated by Turkey, as well as the case relating to the implementation of the 1996 decision regarding the restitution of her property.

The applicant and her daughter recently had a series of contacts, in Strasbourg, during which they “became aware of the December 4, 2008 Committee of Ministers’ prima facie decision regarding the individual measures and the Secretariat’s recommendation to the Committee of Ministers to close the case”.

In her letter, Loizidou asks the Committee of Ministers to adjourn consideration of her case in their current meeting and give her the opportunity to set out her views regarding her property claims.

Turkey asks the Committee of Ministers to take a decision to close the supervision of the case, following the damages paid to the applicant. Regarding the restitution of the property, Ankara points to the immovable property commission, operating in the Turkish-occupied part of the island.

The European Court of Human Rights sentenced Turkey in numerous cases, brought forward by Greek Cypriots, concerning the violation of their fundamental human rights, following the 1974 invasion, with regards to their property.

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