Cyprus Mail
Health

Five more medical groups opt out of Gesy  (Update 2)

The association of private hospitals, the oral and maxillofacial society and the association of private doctors are the three latest groups to join the ever-growing number of medical specialties who have advised their members not to back the National Health Scheme (Gesy).

The association of private hospitals said they lack sufficient data about the plan and are seriously concerned over the details that they have been given. The doctors claim they need to continue operating to same high standards they always have and are uncertain being part of Gesy would allow that.

The vascular and endovascular surgery association announced their non-participation earlier in the day.

Their decision was publicised just hours after the radiological association announced they too are not joining the scheme.

Both associations said in statements that “the project is doomed to failure from the start”.

They both also called on all stakeholders to listen to the concerns of the medial world and make the necessary changes for Gesy to become sustainable and functional.

The vascular and endovascular association said they supported the creation of a modern and viable Gesy for the benefit of patients but expressed deep concern over “the gaps, ambiguities and, above all, the viability” of the proposed plan and the serious impact that its failure would have on the health of patients.

The private radiologists urged Gesy chiefs to pay more attention to the requirements of their medical area.

The price which has been set per medical treatment does not even cover the cost of the material and technological equipment, and thus the Health Insurance Organisation (HIO) in charge of private doctors’ applications to Gesy, needs to think again, the radiologists said.

By Thursday, eight other private specialist groups had announced they would not back Gesy, rheumatologists, intensivists, urologists, nuclear medicine physicians, ear, nose and throat (ENT) doctors, endocrinologists, paediatricians and gastroenterologists. Cardiologists said its members would each decide individually.

President Nicos Anastasiades is to meet with the medical association (CyMA) next week to discuss the situation.

 

 

 

 

The vascular and endovascular surgery association is the latest private medical group to join the ever-growing number of private medical specialties who have advised their members not to back the National Health Scheme (Gesy).

Their decision was publicised just hours after the radiological association announced they too are not joining the scheme.

Both associations said in statements that “the project is doomed to failure from the start”.

They both also called on all stakeholders to listen to the concerns of the medial world and make the necessary changes for Gesy to become sustainable and functional.

The vascular and endovascular association said they supported the creation of a modern and viable Gesy for the benefit of patients but expressed deep concern over “the gaps, ambiguities and, above all, the viability” of the proposed plan and the serious impact that its failure would have on the health of patients.

The private radiologists urged Gesy chiefs to pay more attention to the requirements of their medical area.

The price which has been set per medical treatment does not even cover the cost of the material and technological equipment, and thus the Health Insurance Organisation (HIO) in charge of private doctors’ applications to Gesy, needs to think again, the radiologists said.

By Thursday, eight other private specialist groups had announced they would not back Gesy, rheumatologists, intensivists, urologists, nuclear medicine physicians, ear, nose and throat (ENT) doctors, endocrinologists, paediatricians and gastroenterologists. Cardiologists said its members would each decide individually.

President Nicos Anastasiades is to meet with the medical association (CyMA) next week to discuss the situation.

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