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Poll indicates strong gains for Elam in European elections

An Elam protest demanding the closure of the checkpoints last year

Main opposition Akel appears to be closing the gap on ruling Disy, while nationalists Elam could overtake socialists Edek to become the fourth largest party in Cyprus, a recent opinion poll has shown.

The survey gauged public sentiment ahead of the May 26 European Parliament elections. It polled 1000 individuals by phone.

Conducted around the time of the release of the report documenting the demise of the co-op bank – which pundits say reflects badly on the Disy-led administration – the poll discerned a higher interest among the public to vote compared to the 2014 European Parliament elections.

The survey, disseminated to political parties and to the media, found that public engagement was comparable to the 2018 presidential elections in Cyprus.

The findings indicate that Disy is haemorrhaging supporters to Elam; as many as 5 per cent of Disy fans could end up turning to the nationalist party.

Unlike Disy, Akel does not appear to be experiencing leakage. Of those respondents who identified as traditional Akel supporters, 70 per cent said they were sure to vote for the party.

Akel came in second place with 21 per cent, trailing Disy at 24 per cent.

Meanwhile Diko is clinging to third spot, at about 8 per cent. At the same time, the newly formed party known as the Democratic Front – comprising Diko dissidents who broke away – should garner around 2 per cent, though nowhere enough to elect a MEP this time.

But if the Democratic Front does secure over 2 per cent, it could give the party a big push ahead of the 2021 local parliamentary elections.

As for Edek, its slide continues, with the poll finding only 3.1 per cent will vote for it. At the same time, Elam is projected to garner 4.5 per cent, supplanting Edek as the fourth largest party.

Should Edek lose its one seat in the European Parliament, this could pose a leadership problem for Marinos Sizopoulos.

Elsewhere the Greens and the Citizens Coalition, running on a common ticket, are expected to gain about 2 per cent.

Assuming this coalition does relatively well in the upcoming ballot, commentators say these two parties could formally merge in the aftermath.

Cyprus elects six people to the European Parliament.

In the 2014 elections, Disy and Akel elected two MEPs each, Diko one MEP, and a coalition of Edek and the Greens one MEP.

 


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