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Cyprus

Disy prepares for election post mortem

The political office of ruling Disy is convening on Monday evening to discuss the future of the party following the disappointing results of last month’s European elections.

Around 150 Disy members are expected to attend.

The meeting was convened by leader Averof Neophytou after the party won the largest share of the votes (29.02 per cent) but still dropped almost nine points compared to its showing in the 2014 European Parliament elections.

Its leadership faces criticism for steering the party toward a ‘nationalistic’ direction and rhetoric.

Monday’s meeting is seen as a showdown of sorts between the two trends inside the party: the moderates and those who are taking a more nationalistic tone.

The party has been under criticism even by many of its own members over Neophytou’s stance during the election campaign but also the government and some of its candidate MEPs.

The party leader drew the ire of many after his warning a few days before the elections that if Greek Cypriots were to abstain from the ballot, Turkish Cypriots could determine the outcome.

President Nicos Anastasiades and government spokesman Prodromos Prodromou too had made comments appearing to disparage Turkish Cypriot voters through references to the “borrowed votes” Akel was seeking from Turkish Cypriots.

Disy’s super-nationalist member and MEP candidate, Eleni Stavrou, did not help the situation after writing a post on Facebook essentially calling Akel’s Turkish Cypriot candidate Niyazi Kizilyurek, an agent for Turkey.

According to reports, the ministers of finance and foreign affairs, Harris Georgiades and Nikos Christodoulides will attend the meeting and plan on making interventions.

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