Cyprus Mail
Business

Real GDP growth will slow in 2019, UCy says

The finance ministry

The University of Cyprus’ Economics Research Centre has predicted that real GDP growth will slow from 3.9 per cent in 2018 to 3.4 per cent in 2019, a rate which will also remain in 2020.

In its Economic Outlook, published on Friday, the Economics Research Centre notes that the growth momentum of the Cypriot economy is expected to moderate in 2019 and 2020.

“Real GDP growth is projected to slow from 3.9 per cent in 2018 to 3.4 per cent in 2019 and to remain at 3.4 per cent in 2020,” it says.

The outlook, it continues, is forecast to remain favourable due to domestic and external factors, such as robust activity and employment growth in Cyprus in the previous quarters, higher-than-expected growth in the euro area and the UK in the first quarter of 2019, supportive external financial conditions, low inflation, strong fiscal performance in Cyprus, and further progress in the domestic banking sector.

Recent developments in business and consumer survey data reflect lower expectations of activity growth in the euro area and the UK, as well as the absence of broad-based confidence gains in Cyprus, weakening the growth momentum in the following quarters, it points out.

According to the Economics Research Centre downside risks to the projections may stem from slower progress with private sector deleveraging and slower progress with the reduction of NPLs.

“The newly proposed changes to the law on foreclosures are expected to cause delays in the foreclosure procedures and limit the effectiveness of the legal tools,” it notes.

Such amendments, it adds, may intensify downside risks to the outlook by renewing instability in the banking system, undermining Cyprus’ credibility, denting investor and depositor confidence, and weakening repayment discipline.

It continues pointing out that the high level of public debt together with the strong link between bank and sovereign risk, poses risks to the outlook, especially if amendments to the law on foreclosures similar to those recently proposed are enacted.

Also, upward pressures on public expenditure such as from the public sector wage bill and/ or the newly introduced General Health System “may weaken the outlook.”

Downside risks could arise from higher uncertainty surrounding the UK’s exit from the EU, weaker-than-expected growth in the UK and the euro area, and geopolitical tensions in the Eastern Mediterranean, it says.

On the other hand, upside risks to the outlook are associated with a higher degree of materialisation of investment plans such as investments relating to tourism, property developments or shipping than that reflected in the predictions.



Related posts

Paphos rubbish collectors announce strike

Gina Agapiou

Ankara ‘will not hesitate’ to dispatch third drillship to the region

Elias Hazou

‘You aided the killer every step of the way’, judge tells double-murder accomplice

Evie Andreou

AG’s office studying match-fixing file from Spanish authorities 

Nick Theodoulou

Anastasiades discusses Cyprus and halloumi with von der Leyen

Plans for new psychiatric hospital to be submitted in the coming days

Jonathan Shkurko