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Unique work of art in Paphos is first snorkelling park in Cyprus

The shells are made of environmentally friendly concrete

An underwater sculpture of beautifully crafted seashells created by artist, Yiota Ioannidou, is already attracting marine life and settling in well on the Paphos seabed around six weeks after it was put in place, according to officials.

The project is the first official snorkelling park in Cyprus and is in the municipal baths area of Kato Paphos.

“The seashells have been placed in a protected marine area and will help to enrich marine life. The sculptures are a unique point of reference and offer an experience for free diving with rich marine life, archaeological treasures and contemporary artwork,” a spokesman for the Paphos regional board of tourism said on Wednesday.

The ‘Divine Shells’ project consists of three sculptural compositions of different sized shells placed on the seabed and a smaller creation of urchin shells on nearby rocks.

The shells are made of environmentally friendly concrete and are a tribute to the goddess Aphrodite.

The project is part of a wider aim of the local tourism board which also includes recording and monitoring of biodiversity and the provision of information for a more sustainable and responsible tourism, he noted.

“At the same time, the swimmers’ interest is piqued and their experience enhanced. Their geometrical composition and internal structure contributes to the attraction and installation of marine organisms, but they are also a wonderful work of art in the centre of a fully protected zone,” the spokesman said.

 

Some of the ‘shells’ placed on the rocks

 

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