Cyprus Mail
Americas Middle East World

Pompeo urges coalition to take back Islamic State detainees

Islamic State has lost almost all of its territory in Iraq and Syria

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Thursday urged members of the coalition fighting Islamic State to take jihadi detainees back to their countries and step up their funding to help restore infrastructure in Iraq and Syria, parts of which were severely damaged by conflict.

“Coalition members must take back the thousands of foreign terrorist fighters in custody, and impose accountability for the atrocities they have perpetrated,” Pompeo said at the opening of a meeting of foreign ministers from the global coalition to defeat Islamic State.

Islamic State has lost almost all of its territory in Iraq and Syria. Former leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi was killed in a US raid last month, but the militant group remains a security threat in Syria and beyond.

Some 10,000 Islamic State detainees and tens of thousands of family members remain in camps and prisons in northeastern Syria guarded by the Syrian Kurdish allies of the United States. Washington is pushing European countries to take their citizens back, but so far they have been reluctant to do so.

Pompeo also asked coalition members to help fill the gap in funding to restore essential services and rebuild critical infrastructure in Iraq to facilitate the return of millions of displaced Iraqis. He added that similar help will be required in northeastern Syria.

He also said there were growing concerns about the threat of Islamic State outside of Iraq and Syria, saying the coalition should focus on West Africa and the Sahel.



Related posts

Police clash with protesters at anti-lockdown demonstration in London

Reuters News Service

France reports new daily record in COVID-19 cases

Reuters News Service

Belarus police detain hundreds of protesters in Minsk

Reuters News Service

Kremlin critic Navalny posts photo of himself walking

Reuters News Service

Two dead as rare storm hits central Greece

Reuters News Service

New UK lockdown likely sooner rather than later, says former advisor

Reuters News Service