Cyprus Mail
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Greek Cypriots have a lot more to lose from the absence of a solution

Cyprus is unable to influence the affairs of the EU or the UN either politically or economically.

Cyprus’ main goal to achieve by entry in the EU was the removal of the forced divide present on the island. The 3 fundamental freedoms of the common EU – that of freedom of movement, settlement and acquisition of property – are clearly violated in Cyprus.

By accepting Cyprus as a member, the EU wanted to send a clear message about its’ commitment to acquiring an international political role. More specifically, the EU could play a critical role in the resolution of the Cyprus problem, thus reversing perceptions about foreign policy ineffectiveness.

The Greek Cypriots have a lot more to lose from the absence of a solution than the Turkish Cypriots. Firstly, there is the current feeling of insecurity, which a large Turkish military presence in the north entails. Then, there is the human pain experienced by the refugees, who are still not able to go back to their homes. Refugees are denied their legal right to return to their homes and use their property as they see fit, thereby foregoing substantial economic benefits and personal happiness.

When Cyprus became a member of the EU, the Cyprus problem became by definition a European problem too. In the current circumstances, Cyprus is now perceived as a nuisance

BB

EU and UN are losing patience



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