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33 clubs called to hand over evidence on football corruption

The investigation into the corruption found inside Cypriot football is once again at the forefront. On Monday, the Sports Ethics Committee notified 33 football clubs from the island’s first three divisions, as well as the women's football championship, that they have been summoned to hand over evidence and other information to the committee’s chief investigator.

The investigation into the corruption found inside Cypriot football is once again at the forefront. On Monday, the Sports Ethics Committee notified 33 football clubs from the island’s first three divisions, as well as the women’s football championship, that they have been summoned to hand over evidence and other information to the committee’s chief investigator.

Out of the 33 clubs summoned to hand over the requested information, seven are from the first division, 14 from the second division, and six are from the third division. The remaining six clubs are from the women’s football championship.

Earlier this year, the Cyprus government created a new legislative committee specifically tasked with generating legally binding acts of policy aiming to combat corruption in Cypriot football.

Further to that, then Minister of Justice Giorgos Savvides stated that a designated police unit had been appropriately strengthened so that it could adequately look into the issue of match fixing.

This was also the time when the Justice minister had announced the creation of the aforementioned Sports Ethics Committee, which was created with an inherently wide-ranging authority to detect and track unethical behaviour of people involved in sports, although it is accepted that football was the primary focus.

“The task of cleaning uo the dirt in football is not an easy one, but the beginning of the tangle has been found,” Savvides told the CyBC at the time, shortly after a match fixing case had been opened.

Though a lot has happened in regards to corruption in Cypriot football, particularly when it comes to evidence stemming from the case involving Spanish football, Cypriot authorities said that they could not act on the details that emerged in the past 12 months.

The police said that the means used to acquire the evidence in question were unusable, as they are deemed illicit in Cyprus, falling under the category of ‘unauthorized surveillance of a telephone conversation’.

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