Cyprus Mail
Cyprus

Limassol butcher shop spearheads meat donation programme

Klappis, Board Showing The Amount 'on Hold'
Klappis board showing the amount 'on hold'

A Limassol butcher shop has come up with an ingenious idea to help those in need, by offering them meat paid for with money donated by customers.

Though Klappis Meat Market has been implementing the ‘se anamoni’ (on hold) programme for about a year now, it is not until recently that it became more widely known, with a little help from social media.

“When we started not many people had expressed interest, both to donate money or receive help,” owner of the business, Pambos Klappis told the Cyprus Mail, adding that gradually things started to change.

A woman who recently noticed what the business was doing posted about the project on Facebook, and since then more people started calling even from other districts, expressing interest in helping.

Klappis said that he first saw this charity system in Athens, implemented in cafeterias and bakeries and thought it was a very good idea. After finding out more about how this works, he decided to introduce it in his business.

“Gradually people started showing interest, each offering what they can,” he said.

As regards the distribution to the needy, he said, the shop asks for some confirmation or official document, to make sure the products go to those who truly need them.

The shop encourages customers to purchase a ticket for the amount they wish to donate and that money is reserved for the purchase of meat products .

The amount that is ‘on hold’ is recorded on a board at the shop.

 

For more information: https://www.facebook.com/klappisbutchery

 

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