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Villa’s Grealish to undergo medical before £100m Man City move

aston villa vs everton fc
The fee for the Aston Villa captain would surpass the £89m Man United paid to re-sign France midfielder Paul Pogba from Juventus in 2016

Aston Villa captain Jack Grealish will undergo a medical at Manchester City on Thursday before finalising a 100 million-pounds ($139 million) deal with the Premier League champions, Sky Sports reported on Wednesday.

The 25-year-old will become the most expensive player in Premier League history if the transfer goes through, breaking the previous record held by Paul Pogba, who rejoined Manchester United from Juventus in 2016 for a reported 89.3 million pounds.

Grealish started his career at Villa’s academy before making his senior debut in 2014. The playmaker, who was given the captain’s armband in March 2019, has played more than 200 games for the West Midlands club, scoring 32 goals.

He was part of England’s campaign at Euro 2020, where coach Gareth Southgate’s team lost to Italy in a penalty shootout in the final.

Grealish’s signing will strengthen manager Pep Guardiola’s squad as the Spaniard looks to retain their Premier League title and fight for Champions League glory.

British media said City are also keen to sign Tottenham Hotspur striker Harry Kane for a fee reported to be in excess of 100 million pounds.

City face FA Cup holders Leicester City in the Community Shield on Saturday. They begin their league title defence with a trip to Tottenham Hotspur on Aug. 15.

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