Cyprus Mail
CM Regular Columnist Opinion

Those in court are not the guilty ones in CyTA scam

Interior Minister Socrates Hasikos

By Loucas Charalambous

THE DETAILS of the Cyta scandal that were revealed over the last months, culminating in the outrageous revelations in court on Wednesday, may have left many people speechless but certainly came as no surprise to those who knew the extent of the corruption and dishonesty that prevails in our political system.

Things have been made very clear – the big culprits are not businessman Nicos Lillis, cited as the ‘brains’ behind the scam, not the policemen charged with fabricating reports and not the people who were arrested on Tuesday. These individuals, even if they are found guilty of the charges they face, were just the people who were needed, and used, so that the crime could be perpetrated. It could have been others.

But at the given time these were the people the political mafia needed and used. What I mean is that the moral instigators and the big culprits in this story have not appeared in court and should be sought elsewhere. A good place to look would be in the cess-pit of our political establishment which gave birth, nurtured and has maintained for decades the environment in which the big feast takes place, with our politicians usually seated at the high table.

If there was no political cover, Stathis Kittis, Lillis and Costas Miamiliotis (even if they are found guilty by court) would not have been able to pull off what they are being accused of today.

The current case lends convincing support to my view. We only have to take a look at the way the story unfolded. The first allegation was made by a member of the CyTA board in a letter he sent to then president Demetris Christofias in January 2011; relevant documents were sent to the Attorney-General. The matter was also submitted for discussion at the House watchdog committee.

Since then, many details of the scam were published in the press but Attorney-General Petros Clerides pretended he had neither seen nor heard anything; ditto the Chief of Police Michalis Papageorgiou. Christofias presumably threw the letter in his waste-paper basket.

The House committee eventually discussed the matter 15 months after its submission, in April 2012. Many details relating to the case were revealed, including the information about the existence of two fabricated reports by KYP, the security service.

Again the Attorney-General and Police Chief ignored the matter. At this time there was another bizarre development. At a meeting of the watchdog committee, attended by then deputy leader of DISY Averof Neophytou and AKEL deputy Nicos Katsourides, neither of whom was a member of the committee it was decided to stop the discussion of the matter.

In short, if the interior minister Socratis Hasikos, a year after the cover-up of the case by Katsourides and Neophytou, had not re-opened it and did not show the persistence and determination to shed light on it, persuading the Council of Ministers to appoint an investigative committee and order a police investigation, nobody would be talking about the case now.

Kittis would have been sitting in his office, Lillis would be doing the same and the policemen would be engaging in KYP work. And of course the members of our political mafia would have found some other real estate or public tenders from which to line their pockets.

And if there were press reports of a new big feat, Neophytou and Katsourides would again have taken the trouble to go to the legislature and sort things out.

The big feast, dear readers, will never end. This is Cyprus, this is our joke-state, these are our politicians; and we are the deluded fools who will go and vote for them again at the next elections. Whatever else they do to us, we deserve it.



Related posts

The men in my life

CM Guest Columnist

Our View: EU Commission speaking for us all in expressing concern

CM: Our View

Our View: Cyprus-Russia compromise tax deal a better option than seeing it scrapped

CM: Our View

Lebanon meltdown

Gwynne Dyer

Trump’s election tactic, an October surprise

Gwynne Dyer

Is there a chance of striking a deal with Turkey?

Christos Panayiotides

1 comment

Comments are closed.