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Asia World

China’s facial recognition roll out reaches into mobile phones, shops and homes

China on Sunday put into effect new regulations that require Chinese telecom carriers to scan the faces of users registering new mobile phone services, a move the government says is aimed at cracking down on fraud.

The rules, first announced in September, mean millions more people will come under the purview of facial recognition technology in China.

The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) did not say which companies will provide the telecoms providers with these services but China is home to some of the world’s leaders in facial recognition software, including Megvii and SenseTime.

WHAT ARE THE NEW RULES FOR CHINESE MOBILE PHONE USERS?

China’s telecom operators must now use facial recognition technology and other means to verify the identity of people opening new mobile phone accounts.

China’s three largest carriers are state-owned China Telecom, China Unicom and China Mobile. It was unclear how the law applies to existing mobile accounts.

WHERE ELSE IN CHINA HAS THE TECHNOLOGY BEEN USED?

Supermarkets, subway systems and airports already use facial recognition technology. Alibaba gives customers the option to pay using their face at its Hema supermarket chain and runs a hotel in its headquarters city of Hangzhou where guests can scan their face with their smartphones for advance check-in.

The metro systems of some major Chinese cities have announced they will use the technology, with government-owned newspaper China Daily saying Beijing will use it to “classify passengers” to allow for “different security check measures”.

In July, the Xinhua news agency said Beijing had, or was in the process of, installing facial recognition systems at the entrances of 59 public rental housing communities.

Reuters reported last year on its wide use in the western Xinjiang region, an area wracked by separatist violence and a crackdown by security forces that has seen Uighur Muslims and members of other ethic groups detained in camps. China says the camps are re-education and training centres.

Chinese police are also known to have high tech surveillance gadgets such as glasses with built-in facial recognition.

HOW HAS ITS INTRODUCTION BEEN VIEWED BY THE CHINESE PUBLIC?

Surveillance technologies have encountered little public opposition, but there has been some mostly anonymous debate on social media platforms like Weibo.



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